Posts Tagged ‘diaper pail’

Do You Really Need That? I Did: Rethinking Baby Registry Lists

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

 

baby registry

You know you’ve seen the list circulating the Internet, the lists of baby things you “don’t really need”. If you’re a first-time mom you may be likely to heed the advice of these lists because who wants to waste money on things you don’t really need? Sure there are plenty of things that you can live without but in my opinion there are quite a few things on those lists of things to not buy that made my life so much easier! Here are three of my favorite “don’t need” must haves:

Bottle Warmer. I absolutely agree that you can run hot water over a bottle to heat it but do you want to stand by the sink while you wait or would you rather be doing something else–like calming a baby? A bottle warmer can not only help you multi-task, it can also help keep you from overheating it and keep away the temptation of nuking it in the microwave, which La Leche League warns against because of the possibility of uneven heating and hot spots.

Wipe Warmer. The last thing I need in the middle of the night is even louder screaming from a baby who doesn’t want a cold wipe on their bottom. In my opinion, anything you can do to keep a baby comfortable is worth the money. Being comfortable lowers their stress levels, as well as yours.

Diaper Pail. Maybe it’s just me, but I don’t empty the trash every single day and I certainly would not have been flushing baby poop down a toilet before trashing a disposable diaper. Diaper pails
can handle a big load of smelly diapers without stinking up a room. If you know you won’t be taking your trash to the dumpster every day and you don’t want to smell dirty diapers, I’d invest in one of these!

Jacqueline Banks is a certified Holistic Health Counselor. She works with women in all stages of motherhood, from mothers struggling with conception to those trying to get their groove back after pregnancy to ensure the best health and nutrition for both mom and baby. 

7 Solutions for Common Cloth Diaper Dilemmas

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

For the most part cloth diapering is easy and straight-forward, however you might occasionally encounter one or more of the following diaper dilemmas. Here are Solutions for Common Cloth Diaper Dilemmas

1. Diapers are Super Stinky– If baby’s diapers are super stinky even when they are “clean”, it’s time to strip them. I usually need to strip mine every three to four months. I love freshly stripped diapers.

2. Diapers are Leaking – There are several things that can cause cloth diapers to leak. I have found that ensuring a proper fit is usually your best protection against diaper leaks. This might mean going up a size if using sized diapers or adjusting the waist and rise if using one size diapers.

3. Diapers are Stained – The easy-peasy, all natural solution to stained cloth diapers is to sun them for a few hours! The sun acts as a natural bleaching agent to kill bacteria as well remove stains and funky odors. It’s actually kind of magical how renewed diapers look after a few hours in the sun.

4. Hook and Loop Doesn’t Stay Together – A common complaint of hook and loop closures is that lint gets stuck in them which can eventually make the closures lose their “grip”. If your hook and loop closures aren’t staying put, try gently cleaning them off with a toothbrush to remove any tangled up lint or hair.

5. Baby’s Room Smells like Dirty Diapers – Wherever you store your dirty diapers, be sure they are stored in a high quality, anti-bacterial pail liner until wash day. This will help eliminate/reduce odors. Dunking or spraying messy diapers before placing them in your diaper pail helps cut down on odor too. Another idea is to use a few drops of an essential oils or Rockin’ Green Pail Freshener to keep baby’s room smelling fresh and inviting.

6. Baby Takes Dirty Diaper Off– It seems like this is the one area we don’t encourage independence with our little ones because it can get really messy, really fast! Using snap closures usually reduces this problem or at least prolongs it for a while. However the most determine Houdinis will still work their magic to strip off their soiled diaper. Sometimes reverting back to using onsies on a daily basis can help prevent baby from being able to take their own diaper off. Even if it doesn’t fully prevent it, it adds an extra barricade which lengthens the time it takes baby to get all layers off, giving you more time to intervene.

7. You Can’t Stop Buying Cloth Diapers  – It’s a known fact that cloth diapering is addicting. Just be sure to take full advantage of great sales and discounts when purchasing cloth diapers to be able to buy more diapers, er I mean to maximize your budget. Also if you have not already, sign up for Mom’s Milk Boutique rewards program. You get 50 Milk Miles just for creating an account. Also by participating in Fan Photo Friday you have the opportunity to win 25 Milk Miles each Friday.

-Sarah

Cloth Diaper Storage

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

I am super excited because I recently (as in today) re-ogranized our cloth diapering area. Yes folks, this is the kind of stuff that excites me. 🙂 Our old system was not very functional and not only made it cumbersome to diaper baby, but it was also rather cumbersome to wash/put clean diapers away. I have been wanting to organize it for a long time to streamline the diapering and laundry process. I finally did it today and my diaper area now looks like this:

Ohhh…ahhhh, right?!? The four metal baskets and the frame were the deal of the day yesterday at Ikea for $9.99! (I love all things Ikea!) They actually hold a surprisingly large amount of diapers and the unit is quite durable. The black metal diaper pail (also from Ikea) is the same one I have used for a long time, it’s just now located in a more convenient spot; next to the diapering area which is so much better than carrying the dirty diapers to the pail like we used to do.

I organized each drawer by type of diaper. My all-in-ones and pre-stuffed pockets are in the top drawer. These are my everyday diapers. The second drawer has my fitteds and covers in it, which are primarily used for overnight diapers. The third drawer is full of random diapering accessories such as wetbags, liners, inserts, changing pad, etc. The bottom drawer is my remaining fitted diapers and of course my Grandma El’s Diaper Rash Remedy.

What I love about this new organization system is that it is in the bathroom! This is highly functional because it’s near running water for using cloth wipes, the toilet for dunking or spraying dirty dipes, and the bathtub for those occasional diaper emergencies when a quick bath would be way more efficient/effective than using a bizillion wipes. I can either change baby on the countertop or on the floor. I have a changing pad I can put out as needed, but I don’t use it every time. The little turquoise basket on the countertop holds our cloth wipes. I can wet them as needed or spray baby’s bum with a water bottle. It feels like everything I need to quickly and neatly cloth diaper is right within hands reach. My son’s clothes are in a dresser right outside the bathroom door so everything to dress baby is nearby too. I love it!!

It’s taken me a while to figure out the best cloth diapering storage area for our house and family’s needs, but I am super stoked about this set-up and wanted to share!  And my favorite part is the total cost was $10!

What does your cloth diaper storage area look like? What do you use to store your diapers? Would love to hear what works for you!

-Sarah

 

Beginner’s Guide to Caring for Cloth Diapers

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

One reservation about using cloth that I commonly hear is in regards to dealing with dirty diapers. I will be honest that I was a bit hesitant about it myself. Although once I started using cloth diapers, I quickly realized my worries about washing them were completely unfounded. It was actually quite simple to develop a cloth diapering care routine and the little extra time it took was well worth the economical benefit of using cloth. Here are answers to three frequently asked questions about caring for cloth diapers:

1. How do you store dirty diapers?
Okay, I admit that I was a bit concerned about having poopy diapers sit around my house; or worse yet carrying a poopy diaper around in my diaper bag. That was before I knew about pail liners and wetbags. Both are used to hold your dirty diapers until wash day keeping germs, odors, and moisture well contained. Most brands of liners and wetbags are made out of PUL fabric, however there are wool options if you prefer to use natural fibers. Wetbags are smaller bags used for holding dirty diapers in your diaper bag when you are out and about. They come in a variety of styles and sizes. Typically they will hold from 2 to 8 diapers depending on the size/style you use.  Some zip close and others have draw strings on them; I have used both and find them equally effective. You will want a few wetbags in your rotation so you always have a clean one available to use. A pail liner is larger than a wetbag and stores several days worth of dirty diapers at home. They are available in two different styles; a hanging pail or a liner that you can place inside a diaper pail or a waste basket. Both are equally effective and efficient so it’s simply a matter of personal choice when selecting what style to use. Ideally you want two pail liners in your rotation so you always have a clean one available. Wet diapers can be placed directly into wetbag or pail liner. Poopy diapers may need to be dumped out, dunked or sprayed first before placing in your wetbag or pail liner. There is also the option of using flushable liners which replace the need to spray, dump, or dunk poops. If you use pocket diapers, you can pull out inserts at this time or wait until you are loading your washing machine to do so.

2. How often do you wash cloth diapers?
So the real question here is how much extra laundry is cloth diapering going to create? Generally it amounts to a couple extra loads of laundry a week. The actual amount of times you wash your diapers weekly is going to depend on the number of diapers in your stash and how many kidlets you are diapering. Ideally you want a large enough stash that you are washing about every third day. Of course it is possible to get by on a smaller stash and wash more frequently, however I often hear mothers report greater satisfaction with cloth diapering when their stash is large enough that they don’t have to wash daily. However you don’t want your dirty diapers to be sitting too long because you could experience mold/mildew issues.

3. How do you wash cloth diapers?

Here’s the wash routine that works well for me but keep in mind that it’s going to vary widely depending on a few different factors. You might need to experiment a little to develop a wash routine that works well for you. When loading my washing machine I make sure all wetbags are emptied, inserts removed, and snapped liners are detached. I select wash setting with hot water. Set the load size accordingly, keeping in mind a large amount of water and small amount of laundry soap is preferred to effectively clean cloth. I always select pre-wash and extra rinse each time I wash my diapers. The type of laundry soap you use is important too. You want to be sure the one you use doesn’t cause excessive build-up on your diapers interfering with the absorbency of them. I prefer to hang dry my diapers and because of the climate I live in (hot, dry, sunny desert) I can pretty much do this year round. I would recommend line drying in the sun when possible as it brightens and freshens diapers as well as reduces wear and tear from tumbling in the dryer.

How often do you wash your cloth diapers? What does your wash routine look like?

-Sarah

 

Tomorrow I will review Attachment Parenting International Principle #5: Ensure Safe Sleep, Physically and Emotionally.