Posts Tagged ‘wetbags’

Sunday Funday Giveaway: Planet Wise Small Wetbag

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

Wetbags are an essential cloth diapering accessory! In fact you want to have a few in your rotation so you always have a clean one available. A wetbag is bag that stores your dirty diapers and is specifically designed to contain odors, germs, and moisture. They come in multiple sizes; some are for use when you are out and about and typically hold anywhere from 1 to 8 diapers. Larger wetbags can hold up to 20 diapers and are used to store your dirty diapers at home until wash day.

Planet Wise makes awesome wetbags! What makes them so awesome? Here’s just¬†a few reasons:

  • PVC Free and Lead Free Zippers
  • Anti-microbial
  • Reusable to avoid using plastic bags, helping to protect our planet
  • Made in the USA
  • Made with high quality designer fabrics with coordinating waterproof inner material and locking zipper.
  • Each bag is innovatively sewn with hidden seams and sealed for no wicking or leaking.
  • Resists most stains odors – keeping smells in.

Planet Wise wetbags come in 3 sizes:

Small – 8″ x 10″¬† holds 1 -2 cloth diapers

Medium 13″ x 16″¬† holds 8-9 cloth diapers

Large – 18″ x 21″¬† holds 16-17 cloth diapers

Aside from all the practical aspects of the Planet Wise Wetbags, they come in super cute colors and prints!! I mean let’s be honest, as cloth diapering mamas we want to have some fun with our fluff and cute prints make us happy!

Want to win a FREE Planet Wise Small Wetbag?!? Enter this week’s giveaway below:
(more…)

Cloth Diapers: How Much Will They Cost Me?

Friday, October 19th, 2012

Often when people are considering using cloth diapers, the main question is how much will it cost me to get started? (What do I do with the poop? is the second most popular question). The answer to this question can vary greatly depending on what type of diaper you purchase and how many diapers you purchase. However my best guesstimate is that in order to get a decent stash and adequate accessories you would probably spend somewhere between $250 Р$500. Yeah, I know that probably sounds like a large chunk of money, but remember that cloth diapering is WAY cheaper than using disposables!

I recommended having at least 25 diapers in your stash, 3 travel wetbags, and 2 pail liners. You can pay as little as $10 per cloth diaper or as much as $25+ per cloth diaper, again depending on the type of diaper you select. While cloth diapers can range in price significantly, there are more factors to consider than just price tag when selecting a diapering system.

The first main¬†decision¬†is do you want/prefer a two-step or a one-step diapering system? Then the second main decision is do you want/prefer sized diapers or one-size diapers? Okay, I know¬†that sounds like a foreign language when you are new to fluff.¬† So let me briefly explain….

A two-step system would consist of an inner absorbent diaper (options are pre-fold, flat, fitted, or contoured) and a separate outer waterproof cover. Generally this is the least expensive route when building your diaper stash. For example, an Econobum trial pack that includes 1 cover and 3 pre-folds retails at $11.95. Keep in mind you can often re-use the same cover through several diaper changes. Basically you remove the soiled inner diaper and replace it with a fresh one. Then as long as the outer diaper cover is clean/dry you can continue to re-use it. That being said you typically need far more of the inner absorbent diaper (ie- pre-fold, flat, fitted, or contoured) than you do of the diaper covers. Hence the reason the Econobum trial pack includes 1 cover and 3 pre-folds. Econobum is a great option to build a diaper stash very inexpensively!

The other option is a one-step diapering system. In a¬†one-step diapering system the inner absorbent diaper and the¬†outer cover are essentially “attached” so there is only one step when diapering baby. Pocket diapers and all-in-ones fall into this category. Many people enjoy the convenience and ease of cloth diapering with a one-step diapering system. Generally cloth diapers that fall into this category are going to cost a bit more per diaper than you would pay for a two-step diapering system (even when you add the cost of the¬†inner diaper and the cover together).

The next consideration is sized diapers versus one-size diapers. A one-size diaper means it is adjustable and developed to fit baby from newborn to potty training. A sized diaper means it comes in sizes such as small, medium, large, etc or size 1, size 2, etc. Once baby outgrows a size, you would need to purchase the next size up. While one-size diapers cost more up front, you generally end up spending as much or perhaps even a tad more if you purchase sized diapers. Although the benefit to sized diapers is that they usually provide an overall better fit, particularly in the newborns stage of diapering.

Okay now, bear in mind you do not have to be a purist when it comes to cloth diapering. You can build yourself an eclectic stash that includes a wide variety of cloth diapers. This is especially beneficial if you have the ability to build your stash over time and take advantage of all the incredible deals as they become available.

Still confused and unsure about where to start and what kind of diapers to purchase? Well then a Cloth Diaper Trial Package might be a good option for you! You’ll get to try out 13 NEW¬†cloth diapering products for 30 days for only $20! Check out the details here!

What was your start-up cost to cloth diapering? What did you start with in your stash? Would love to hear from you!

-Sarah :)

Improving the “not so glamorous” side of cloth diapering

Thursday, February 9th, 2012

As much as I love a fluffy baby bum, there are a few less than glamorous parts to cloth diapering. Okay really there is just one; toddler poop. (I¬†am willing to bet¬†you just nodded in agreement :) ). There are a few ways to help make this aspect of cloth diapering a bit more ‘pleasant’.

Diaper Sprayer – ¬†A diaper sprayer allows you to easily rinse the messiest of diapers right into the toilet! Diaper sprayers attach directly to your toilet for easy and convenient access. They are a super effective way to rinse poopy diapers before washing. If you haven’t tried one, you need to! It’s definitely one of those¬†cloth diapering accessories that can really improve your experience with using cloth.

Flushable Liners РFlushable liners make washing cloth diapers a breeze! You simply place the liner on the cloth diaper so it touches baby’s skin. The liner will allow urine through but will prevent solids from getting onto the diaper, omitting the need to dunk or spray poopy diapers. The liner, along with the mess, is simply flushed away!

High Quality WetbagWhen you are out and about and baby poops, carrying that poopy diaper home to be washed is much more pleasant task if you have a high quality wetbag. The purpose of a wetbag is to contain odors, germs, and moisture. You want to be sure your wetbag does not wick or leak and that it is size-able enough to hold multiple diapers on long outings.

Elimination Communication – Elimination Communication can omit almost entirely the need to ever deal with rinsing toddler poop from a cloth diaper. It is hands-down my best defense against dealing with messy diapers!

Delayed Solids – ¬†Okay, in all fairness avoiding toddler poop is probably not a valid reason to delay solids…rather it’s one of the benefits of delaying solids, among many other.

Hybrid Diapers -  Hybrid cloth diapering systems combine the ecological benefits of cloth with the convenience of disposables. Hybrid systems utilize a disposable insert that can be flushed, composted (not to be used in veggie garden compost), or thrown away.

Often times when people are considering switching to cloth diapers, they are concerned about dealing with the poop. While truth be told dunking dirty dipes is not my favorite activity however it IS well worth the ecological and economical benefits to me!

Do you have any special tips or product suggestions for dealing with messy diapers? Would love to hear from you! :)

-Sarah

Beginner’s Guide to Caring for Cloth Diapers

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

One reservation about using cloth that I commonly hear is in regards to dealing with dirty diapers. I will be honest that I was a bit hesitant about it myself. Although once I started using cloth diapers, I quickly realized my worries about washing them were completely unfounded. It was actually quite simple to develop a cloth diapering care routine and the little extra time it took was well worth the economical benefit of using cloth. Here are answers to three frequently asked questions about caring for cloth diapers:

1. How do you store dirty diapers?
Okay, I admit that I was a bit concerned about having poopy diapers sit around my house; or worse yet carrying a poopy diaper around in my diaper bag. That was before I knew about pail liners and wetbags. Both are used to hold your dirty diapers until wash day¬†keeping germs, odors, and moisture well contained. Most brands of liners and wetbags are made out of PUL fabric, however there are wool options if you prefer to use natural fibers. Wetbags are smaller bags used for holding dirty diapers in your diaper bag when you are out and about. They come in a variety of styles and sizes. Typically they will hold from¬†2 to¬†8 diapers depending on the size/style you use.¬†¬†Some zip close and others have draw strings on them; I have used both and find them equally effective. You will¬†want a few wetbags in your rotation so you always have a clean one available to use. A pail liner is larger than a wetbag and stores several days worth of dirty diapers at home. They are available in¬†two¬†different styles; a hanging pail or a liner that you can place inside a diaper pail or a waste basket. Both are equally effective and efficient so it’s simply¬†a matter of personal choice when selecting what style to use. Ideally you want two pail liners in your rotation so you always have a clean one available. Wet diapers can be placed directly into wetbag or pail liner. Poopy diapers may need to be dumped out, dunked or sprayed first before placing in your wetbag or pail liner. There is also the option of using flushable liners¬†which¬†replace the need to spray, dump, or dunk poops.¬†If you use pocket diapers, you can pull out inserts at this time or wait until you are loading your washing machine to do so.

2. How often do you wash cloth diapers?
So the real question here is how much extra laundry is cloth diapering going to create? Generally it amounts to a couple extra loads of laundry a week. The actual amount of times you wash your diapers weekly is going to depend on¬†the number of¬†diapers in your¬†stash and how many kidlets you are diapering. Ideally you want a large enough stash that you are washing about every third day. Of course it is possible to get by on a smaller stash and wash more frequently, however I often hear mothers report greater satisfaction with cloth diapering when their stash is large enough that they don’t have to wash daily. However you don’t want your dirty diapers to be sitting too¬†long because you could experience mold/mildew issues.

3. How do you wash cloth diapers?

Here’s the wash routine that works well for me but keep in mind that it’s going to vary widely depending on a few different factors. You might need to experiment a little to develop a wash routine that works well for you. When loading my washing machine I make sure all wetbags are emptied, inserts removed, and snapped liners are detached. I¬†select wash setting with hot water. Set the load size accordingly, keeping in mind a large amount of water and small amount of laundry soap¬†is preferred to effectively clean cloth. I always select pre-wash and extra rinse each time I wash my diapers. The type of laundry soap you use is important too. You want to be sure¬†the one you¬†use¬†doesn’t cause excessive build-up on your diapers interfering with the absorbency of them. I prefer to hang dry my diapers¬†and because of the climate I live in (hot, dry, sunny desert) I can pretty much do this year round. I would recommend line drying in the sun when possible as it brightens and freshens diapers as well as reduces wear and tear from tumbling in the dryer.

How often do you wash your cloth diapers? What does your wash routine look like?

-Sarah

 

Tomorrow I will review Attachment Parenting International Principle #5: Ensure Safe Sleep, Physically and Emotionally.

Top 5 Cloth Diapering Accessories

Friday, October 14th, 2011

 

If you are new to cloth diapering, the thought of diapering accessories might make you chuckle. I know I wondered ‚Äúwhat in the world is a diaper accessory? Like diaper swag or something?‚ÄĚ I quickly realized the term encompassed products designed to make using cloth diapers as effective, simple, and convenient as possible.

Cloth Wipes
If you are cloth diapering you might also want to consider using cloth wipes. They are super easy to use and far less expensive than using disposable wipes. You can wet them right at the time of use with a spray bottle or directly from the tap. Another option is to pre-wet them with water or a wipe solution and store in a water proof container. Optimally you would have around 25+ wipes in your rotation to ensure you have clean ones available on wash day.

 

 

Doublers and Inserts
A doubler or an insert is used to provide an extra layer of absorbency for your cloth diapers. Typically a doubler is used with a flat, prefold, or all-in-one while an insert is used to stuff in a pocket diaper, however they can be used interchangeably. They are helpful to use for overnight diapers, a ‚Äėheavy-wetter‚Äô, or older children who tend to urinate less frequently but in large amounts.

 

 

Wetbags and Pail Liners
Wetbags and pail liners are used to store dirty diapers containing both the mess and the odor until wash day. A wetbag is smaller and usually holds about 3 diapers. It is used for when you are out and about to hold your dirty cloth diapers. They are an essential item in your diaper bag. You probably want at least 3 wetbags in your rotation so you always have a clean one available. A pail liner is used to store diapers at home and is available in two styles; a hanging pail or a liner for a trash can. A hanging pail can be hung from a hook or a doorknob. A pail liner can be used with a regular 13 gallon trash bin. On wash day you simply dump everything from your pail into your washing machine and then place your dirty pail in too. You will want at least two pails in your rotation so you always have a clean one available.

Cleaning Detergents
You will want to be sure to select a detergent that is ‚Äėsafe‚Äô for cloth diapers. Many commonly used household detergents will cause build-up on your diapers and interfere with the absorbency of them. There are many brands well known to be safe for cloth diapers and any of these would be an excellent choice. You may experiment a little before determing what wash routine and detergent works best for your cloth diapers and baby’s skin.

 

 

Diaper Sprayer
A diaper sprayer is a hose and nozzle that attaches directly to your toilet and is used to clean messy (ie-poopy) diapers. You can spray your diapers off right into the toilet and then flush the mess away where it belongs. Diaper sprayers are a great tool for cloth diapering families and really make cleaning cloth a cinch! They are easy to install and come with all necessary parts for installation.

What cloth diaper accessory is a must-have on your list? What detergent have you found works best for your diapers?

-Sarah