Posts Tagged ‘first foods’

First Foods at the Holidays

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

First Foods at the HolidaysWhen I think of the holidays, I think of all of the yummy food I get to eat. This year will be a little different since I will have newborn and need to calm down on my eating and start focusing on taking care of my postpartum body. If you have a baby who has recently started solids, the holidays can be a fun time of discovery.

According to USA Today, 40 percent of moms start solids before 4 months old. For me, I waited until at least 6 months old. The American Academy of Pediatrics now suggests waiting until 6 months.

If your baby has hit this age mark and you feel that he or she is ready, Thanksgiving can be a fun time for baby. Here are some baby-friendly foods for Thanksgiving:

-sweet potatoes (These are loaded in Vitamin A! Skip the sugar and marshmallows and if you have an older baby go for finger food.)

-green beans (If you have the casserole prepared, wash off some of the salty toppings first. This one could get messy!)

-pumpkin (Try adding this to cereal or yogurt. Yum!)

-squash (Like all veggies, this should be mashed, thinned, or blended with breast milk or formula.)

-stuffing (Keep this moist. Finely chop the veggies and even add some breast milk or formula.)

-apples

-cranberries

-potatoes

-turkey (With all meats, make sure this is blended or mashed to a consistency baby can handle easily. If your baby is older, you can do small pieces.)

With all solid foods, make sure to introduce new foods to baby slowly. Don’t just give them a whole plate of new foods and expect it to go well. Remember how sensitive a little baby’s tummy can be. Remember to keep the consistency mushy and easy for baby to digest. My babies loved sweet potatoes at the holidays, just like their momma.

Remember you are the mom. Don’t let family just feed your baby anything. I can remember a family member feeding my daughter chocoalate pie at a holiday gathering before we had started solids. I was mortified. Of course, babies don’t need eat sugary desserts and family should respect your position as mom and ask your permission before offering foods to baby.

Different solid foods are recommended for different ages. There are products now like Baby Brezza and Baby Bullet that make creating your own baby food easy and affordable. I am a fan of the Baby Brezza.

Remember that there will be a lot of food around during the holidays and babies like to grab food. Use safety and precautions with your little one to avoid choking or unnecessary tears.

What are some fun holiday foods you have fed your baby? Did they like them? Have fun during the holidays with food and your little one, just remember to be smart and that you are supermom!

Karyn Meyerhoff is a mom of two in Arkansas where she is now ready to eat turkey and sweet potatoes.

Healthy Pancakes for Kids

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

Healthy PancakesPancakes are a favorite breakfast food in our family.  Although well aware that traditional pancakes are not a very healthy way to start the day, I decided to experiment in the kitchen to create a healthier version of pancakes that my kids would still enjoy. Here is the winning recipe:

Ingredients:
1 cup of oatmeal
Âľ cup of milk (whatever type of milk your family uses: cow, goat, coconut, soy, almond, etc)
1 Tablespoon Hemp Seed
1 Tablespoon Maca Powder
2 eggs (if you don’t eat eggs, you can substitute chia seeds)
2 dates
½ teaspoon vanilla
Sprinkle of cinnamon
Coconut oil (for cooking in pan)

Healthy Pancakes

 

Directions:

Throw all ingredients except coconut oil into a blender. Blend on medium speed for approximately a minute or until pancake batter is smooth.

Melt small amount of coconut oil in pan over medium heat. Scoop the batter onto the pan, using approximately 1/4 cup for each pancake. Brown on both sides and serve topped with your favorite fruit.

Recipe yields about 6 pancakes.

Extras: And just for fun you can play with the recipe and try adding in various ingredients to alter both flavor and nutritional value.

  • Cacao nibs
  • Banana
  • Nuts such as almonds, walnuts, or pecans
  • Seeds such as pumpkin or sunflower
  • Coconut flakes
  • Also try topping with cashew nut cream. Yum!

Sarah is a crunchy mama to three boys with a fourth on the way. Her family feels blessed to currently live abroad in the Netherlands and enjoy exploring all it has to offer. 

Three Superfoods Every Baby Should Eat

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

While some mothers choose to avoid solids for the entire first year, others prefer to start sooner. The American Academy of Pediatrics says that most babies can start solids by 6 months, around the time babies begin to be much more active.

When you decide your baby is ready to begin solids, consider introducing some nutritionally dense superfoods instead of the traditional grain-based baby cereal. Babies produce plenty of functional enzymes and digestive juices that help them digest proteins and fats, making these fatty, protein-rich foods perfect first foods.

Introduce only one food at a time, and wait at least four days before introducing another food to rule out the possibility of a negative reaction. Always check with your pediatrician before beginning new foods.

Three Superfoods Every Baby Should EatEgg Yolks. Pediatricians warn us to stay away from egg whites, which may cause an allergic reaction, but the yolk is a nutritional powerhouse. Yolks from pasture-raised hens provide much-needed fat and cholesterol for proper brain and nervous system development, as well as choline, amino acids and vitamin A. Simply boil an egg for about 4 minutes so the yolk is soft but not runny, discard the white and serve with a small amount of unrefined sea salt.

Liver. Pastured, organic, poultry liver is extremely high in vitamin A, which is an important nutrient for developing babies. It also happens to be one of the best sources of usable iron along with vitamin B12 and other nutrients such as choline and cholesterol, which are important for healthy brain development. Start by shredding about a teaspoon of frozen liver (freezing for at least 14 days helps destroy any harmful microbes) onto an egg yolk. Beginning at six months you can serve baby cooked, pureed liver.

Salmon Roe. These nutrient-dense little eggs have some of the highest levels of omega 3s, almost 3.5 times the amount typically found in salmon. In addition to the brain-boosting fats, salmon roe is rich in antioxidants and fat-soluble vitamins along with zinc and iodine. Try serving by themselves or incorporated into a soft-boiled egg yolk.

Jacqueline Banks is a certified Holistic Health Counselor focused on nutrition and green living strategies. She works with women in all stages of motherhood, from mothers struggling with conception, through pregnancy, lactation and beyond to ensure the best health and nutrition for both mother and baby.

Baby’s First Foods

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

Introducing solid foods is a big step for new moms and can be quite confusing. Here are some common questions new moms may have about introducing solids.

Is my baby ready for solid foods?

first food

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for baby during the first six months of life. Below are a few milestones your baby should reach before starting solid food:

  • Baby can sit in high chair with good head control
  • Baby watches you eat, reaches for your food and seems eager to be fed
  • If you offer a spoon of food and baby pushes it out of its mouth; he may not have the ability to move it to the back of his mouth to swallow. If this happens- try to dilute food with breast milk or water or wait a week or two and try again.

Sounds like my baby is ready. What should I feed them first?

Traditionally single-grain cereals are introduced first; however there is no medical evidence that introducing solid foods in any particular order is advantageous for baby. This website has tons of great recipes, nutrition information and pointers on how to prepare homemade baby food.

Are there any foods I should avoid?

What to Expect has a great list of food to avoid. This includes nuts, egg whites, honey, cow’s milk, wheat, juice, shellfish, strawberries and chocolate. These foods can be introduced later, please check with your pediatrician for when these can be safely introduced.

What were your babies’ first foods?

With my first we attempted organic brown rice cereal right at six months. This did not go well; she hated it. We went back to breast milk for few weeks and tried sweet potatoes next time she had solids. Our second was 7.5 months before we gave him solid food and he started with homemade sweet potatoes.

How do you make sweet potatoes for your baby?

Preheat oven to 400* F. Wash and poke holes in sweet potatoes and wrap in foil; bake in oven until soft (30-60 minutes). Puree in blender mixed with water or breast milk for desired consistency. Drop spoonfuls onto cookie sheet to freeze. Once frozen put into Ziploc bags to store in freezer until ready to eat. Thaw and serve.

What was your baby’s first food? What would you do differently with your next child?

Kristen Beggs is a mom of two who enjoyed watching her babies take their first bite. 

 

Why Bone Broth is a Baby Superfood

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

Why Bone Broth is a Baby SuperfoodI know bone broth sounds like a strange choice for feeding your baby, but it’s actually one of the most nutritious foods there is. It is not at all the same as store-bought chicken broth, which is usually watery and not nearly as nutrient dense.

Bone broth is also wonderful for digestion, helps strengthen the digestive tract– helping it prepare for more foods–and can even help reduce the likelihood of food allergies. It’s generally considered safe to introduce bone broth at around 3-4 months of age and is especially great to give your baby during the winter months, since it can help boost the immune system.

As the bones cook, the minerals and nutrients leach from the bones and into the water making is a very nutrient dense food. Homemade broth is full of minerals, gelatin and glycosaminoglycans, which help in the development of healthy bones, hair, nails and joints. So much nutrition is drawn out of the bones that by the end of cooking, the bones typically fall apart when touched.

Making the broth is simple: all you need are some chicken or beef bones and water.

Here’s a simple recipe I use to make it using a slow cooker. It’s easy to make a large amount of broth and then freeze whatever you wont need in the next few days. Using an ice cube tray will help you freeze individual portions you can use for baby. Freezing flat in a Ziploc bag allows you to freeze larger portions you can use for make soup. There are several different ways to add this important food to your baby’s diet. You can simply offer it on a spoon, cup or use it to cut homemade baby food such as pureed meats or vegetables.

Your baby isn’t the only one who can benefit from bone broth. The high gelatin and collagen content can make your hair and nails grow stronger. Its important nutrients are wonderful for nourishing the adrenal glands, making it a healing food for postpartum moms as well.

Jacqueline Banks is a certified Holistic Health Counselor focused on nutrition and green living strategies. She works with women in all stages of motherhood, from mothers struggling with conception, through pregnancy, lactation and beyond to ensure the best health and nutrition for both mother and baby.