Archive for the ‘Cloth Diapers’ Category

EcoPosh Update

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017

img_5260Kanga Care, makers of Rumparooz, Lil Joey, and Ecoposh, revamped a few products this year and introduced an entirely new one, too. Our family has always been a fan of the Kanga Care line. We have a wool cover, large pile of pockets, wetbags, and recently upgraded our fitteds to their newest model. If you haven’t shopped in a little while for cloth diaper and trainer products, this post is for you.

The organic bamboo velour (OBV) is one of the major updates in their classic design. The EcoPosh line, known for its use of recycled water bottles in addition to organic cotton and bamboo, really got the OBV upgrade. The fitted diapers still utilize the double gusset and 6r soaker technology. They still have the four-step rise to last from teeny tiny to 40 pounds. Now they come with the luxuriously soft OBV interior. The colors are updated from the previous earthy tones to deep, vibrant jewel tones including boysenberry, Atlantis, saffron, Caribbean, and an icy grey glacier. Kanga Care updated both the one-size and newborn Ecoposh fitteds.

EcoPoshRumparooz, also Kanga Care, got in on the OBV magic too. I think they took the best of Ecoposh and RaR and put them together into the one-size Rumparooz OBV. It offers all the trademark glory of a Rumparooz one-size diaper (the gussets, four-step rise, 6r soakers, and waterproof TPU) to the freshness of the OBV material. Currently the Rumparooz OBV comes in the five Ecoposh colors, not the entire line of Rumparooz prints and colors.

As for trainers, the Ecoposh trainer continues to have its hidden layer of TPU and the waterproof protection it provides. Each trainer is also made with nearly six water bottles among its materials. The major updates again include the OBV material, far silkier to babe’s skin, and the updated colors.

Rumparooz also now has a line of Lil Learnerz trainers with many of the brand’s beloved prints (and a few more to boot)! They offer patented IMWET technology to help children learn the feeling of wetness while remain waterproof on the exterior. The trainer comes in five sizes up to 44 pounds, and the two smallest sizes offer side snaps for easy, stylish clean up.

Pick yours up today!

Lynette is a mom of three children from 8 months to age four. She has cloth diapered all three since birth and enjoys all things eco-friendly and mindful living.

Why Should We Have to “Have it All”

Monday, December 19th, 2016

have it allSocial media did it again. Another mama went and did something that has a lot of people armed and ready with all their judgments. A mom, ten weeks post-partum, videotaped herself working out as she went about folding cloth diaper laundry from the dryer. Diary of a Fit Mommy is known for her videos incorporating workouts into daily routines and inspires a number of other people, mostly women, to do the same.

I want to be very clear. I have nothing but love for this mama. You get yours! I work out most days of the week and have my own strategies for fitting it in. My routine is a work in progress but I think I get the sentiment behind the idea that we all have time and can find said time if we get creative and honest with ourselves and our day. I also wonder if people would have a strong response to my laundry multi-tasking—folding while talking to my hubby about our day. We are all multi-tasking.

But my first thought upon viewing this video was more of a question: Why must everything be so complex? Can we make single-tasking a fad that sticks? Perhaps the response is doing squats while stuffing cloth diapers is not a complex task. That’s true—it appears relatively easy. I just tried it myself and, yes, it’s simple enough. I’m just wondering what’s so wrong with single-tasking?

All day I’m doing five things at a time. I just want to sit and do the laundry with a show on the TV or even just in the still silence of children in bed. In some ways sitting in the quiet or watching TV still isn’t singular in focus. I might be reflecting on the day or catching up with hubby. Still, can’t I just not always be thinking and acting on the idea of “having it all?”

Lots of women all over the world don’t have it all—they don’t even have the time or resources to play around with the idea of having it all. Sometimes I think what many of us want is just a little simplicity. I am okay with a single focus even if it means I don’t have a “perfectly” slim tummy. For my own sanity I need to not always be doing, fitting everything in, and getting the most out of the day. That just feels like unnecessary pressure and anxiety.

Yet again, that’s what I’ll have to come down to, my own sanity and my own experience. We are all battling different demons; we all have different places we’re coming from and ideas of whom and how we want to be. If you’re in the mood to multi-task your way to a perkier tush while preparing diapers for your baby’s fluffy bum I’m happy you’re finding ways to make your goals reality. I’ll be over here folding laundry and little else, except perhaps taking a sip or two of wine.

Lynette is a mom of three children from 8 months to age four. She has cloth diapered all three since birth and enjoys all things eco-friendly and mindful living.

Geffen Baby Prefolds Review

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

img_0113Geffen Baby is a Los Angeles-based company that is passionate about their work for babies and the environment. Their products range from cloth diapers to nursing pads. Most of their products–95 percent–are made here in the U.S.A. Their website is super informative and also a great place to shop. (This is dangerous when you’re pregnant and still working on the baby’s cloth diaper stash!) I got the opportunity to try out one of their prefold diapers and tell you what I think. Here’s what I discovered.

Quality

This is by far the softest prefold diaper I have ever touched. When it arrived at my house, it was packaged neatly and beautifully. I was sent a extra-large jersey prefold with navy blue trim. The color of trim is different by size. The age suggestion is 18 months to potty trained. My son, Levi, is 25 months old, so this was perfect. The prefold is made of 60 percent hemp and 40 percent organic cotton. I seriously could touch this thing all day! I can imagine it has to feel amazing to my little guy’s bottom. The prefolds cost $10.30 a piece, which is a reasonable price for the quality.

Experience

Levi is a squirmy, opinionated 2-year-old, so getting this prefold on was not the easiest process. It’s probably a good thing I didn’t video tape the drama, but we did get it on his little bottom. There was plenty of extra fabric. I folded the prefold down in the back and did a newspaper fold with a snappi. I then used a econobum diaper cover. The fit worked well for Levi and it was absorbent for his diapering needs. I can’t say I would use this prefold all of the time, just because he is getting to be past the cloth diapering stage for us. With baby number 3 arriving in a few weeks, I am working on getting him used to the potty. However, I will definitely keep it and use it for the baby.

Overall Opinion

I am not an expert on cloth diapers, but I would definitely give Geffen Baby prefolds two thumbs up. Compared to other prefolds I have used, this prefold is much more absorbent and better quality. I think they are affordable, and the stitching is done well on them. I am definitely going to look into the newborn quick absorbers for my newest squish. They come in a 3 pack and are only $11.07!

So momma, if you are into cloth diapering and like prefolds, I definitely recommend trying Geffen Baby. I’m just warning you, these things are so soft!

Karyn Meyerhoff is a mom of two, almost three, in Northeast Arkansas where she shops for baby products online way too much. 

Laundry and Different Skin Types

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

There are a lot of plusses to cloth diapering (I know not everybody would agree with me there, but since you’re reading this blog, I think you might feel the same), but one of the best things that I’ve gotten from cloth diapering is how much I’ve learned about laundry. I’m young enough (barely) that Home EC was not a part of the curriculum during my school years, and old enough that my busy working mom wasn’t into home economics herself much, or at least not that she let on. Plus, modern washing machines and detergents kind of made laundry stupid proof, right?

My skin is fairly sensitive, but I can tolerate most detergents, barring the most heavily scented ones. My oldest son, however, was not nearly so lucky. He didn’t have eczema or psoriasis or other more serious skin conditions, but more detergents than not gave him rashes from his clothing (and it was worse with his cloth diapers).

In detergent land, there are two main camps; mainstream detergents, and eco-friendly detergents (plus soaps and soap nuts, not usually recommended for cloth diapers). Both mainstream detergents (like Tide, Dreft, etc) and eco-friendly ones (Ecover, Biokleen, etc) can be scented or “free and clear.” And of course further, come in either powdered or liquid formats (soap nuts obviously don’t fit in either camp).

If you are lucky and have no skin sensitivities in the house, the world is your oyster. Wash with whatever you like (or like many of us, what your budget will allow). But if one or more in your house are sensitive, you will have to be careful (and it may take some trial and error to find the magic bullet).

First, if you have sensitivities in the house, you can decide to wash everybody’s clothing together in the detergent you find works for the sensitive one(s), or you can wash separate, if costs or other factors come into play. When dealing with sensitive skin, I would start with avoiding heavy perfumes. For me, detergents like Gain break me out, but I can tolerate regular Tide and the like OK. My oldest broke out in hives from Tide, but the free and clear version was OK, and he could tolerate some lightly scented natural detergents as well.

Fabric softeners are often a no-no with sensitive skin; they coat fibers so generally shouldn’t be used with diapers, towels or tech fabrics like workout clothes anyway. Some, like Ecover, are compatible with natural fibers and many sensitive skinned people, but there are often no fragrance-free options in the fabric softener world, so they may have to be avoided completely (try vinegar in the rinse cycle, like in a Downy ball), for your clothing if you’re missing fabric softeners, especially if you line dry).

Outside of not breaking you out, your detergent also needs to get the family’s clothing, well, clean. How well different detergents will work for you will depend on many factors, one of which is likely familiar to any cloth diaper vets: water hardness. The harder your water, the more difficulties you may face, from just getting your clothing clean enough (very hard water can require using more detergent and/or a water softening additive like Calgon, which could also affect very sensitive skinned people), to even leaving iron stains on your clothing. Generally, if you have water on the hard side, you will be better served with a powdered detergent as they often have water-softening agents included in the formula.

Another upside to powdered detergents is if you need to order your detergent by mail. Some markets have almost endless options, mainstream to eco to niche, boutique brands. Others … not so much. When you’re shipping liquids, you’re also shipping water, which is heavy (and therefore more costly). Powders can save you a bit of cash sometimes (and a bit of backache too) because of this.

Finally, keep the tricks you learned from your cloth diapers handy when washing clothes for sensitive people handy … Shout may make your daughter’s skin itch, but putting her clothes on the line in the sun (with or without lemon) can remove often just as many (and sometimes more) stains, without adding any more chemicals into the washing machine. Natural fibers can be easier to get fully clean, with both diapers and clothing. And line drying will save you both wear-and-tear and money when/if you’re able.

Meaghan Howard is a mom to three little dudes, a ton of (rapidly aging) pets, and a super sweaty husband. She also loves running and currently lives on a lesser surface of the sun; laundry has become a bit of a part-time job.

How to Upsize Onesize Diapers

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

10-14-16-upsizing-diapers-2One-size diapers usually offer several rows of snaps on the front of their diaper so that you can best customize fit for your child. A number of variables exist for when to size up and down. I’ve always just gone with my baby’s gut. As in, I take a look at my babe to assess when I change rise settings. A few things to consider when you assess your babe’s individual needs:

Each brand varies and fits each babe differently.
Most brands have three settings though a few have a third row of snaps allowing for a fourth, smaller size. Some brands have rows of snaps that may change the fit around the leg of babe when compared to brands with one row of snaps. Some brands are cut more trim or generous, both in their width and length (rise). If that was all gibberish to you, simply know that each brand is uniquely cut and so you may change the rise setting on one brand before you need to on another.

Consider weight.
Some brands have, specific suggestions based on weight or rise measurement (usually in inches), usually listed on their website within the diaper listing’s specs and sizing details. Every babe is built differently, but generality is helpful. The lowest rise setting usually is for a babe 8-15ish pounds. And medium rise setting(s) usually fit babes 15-25ish pounds. The largest rise setting (not snapped down at all) covers baby 25ish pounds and beyond. I use the “ish” because each brand varies as does each baby. I say to consider weight because if your baby weighs 14 pounds it is very unlikely (though possible) that you’d be on the largest setting.

10-14-16-upsizing-diapersOther size matters.
A tall slim baby and short plum baby can both weigh the same thing but the diaper fit very differently on the same settings. Height matters. Other particulars of a baby can make a difference in rise as well, like a babes particular bum size (large or flat, adequate or plump… whatever words you choose to use).

Make room for absorbency.
Diapers you use with increased absorbency (for night or naps) may require more space for the additional inserts. One easy way to get that extra space is by upsizing the snap setting.

Leaky baby?
If you are getting leaks around the legs you might be too tight (causing compression leaks) or too loose (allowing mess to leave the diaper before having the chance to absorb). You may need to size up (for compression) or down (for a diaper that’s loose).

Red lines.
Not unlike the red line on that pregnancy test you took months ago, red lines on the babe’s thighs let you know your babe is a growin’. While lines do not typically mean your baby is uncomfortable, a red line across the top of the thigh can mean the diaper is hitting low on him or her. Adjusting the rise to a larger size allows the diaper to sit higher on your baby’s body.upsize

Gaping front.
If the diaper gapes open under the belly button in spite of your attempts to close the diaper snug, it may be time to size up.

After considering all of the above particulars, if you still aren’t sure try changing the rise on just a few of your diapers and see if the fit just seems better.  Sometimes there is no clear answer as there are so many ways you can customize fit (rise, waist, and hip snaps). Generally you want to check that the waist and leg elastics are snug but not too tight, with the diaper sitting just under the belly button. If the fabric is droopy or excessive between the legs, you may be able to size down. The child shown in the diaper at each size setting could wear the diaper at two of the rise settings with success.

If you make it to the largest rise setting and your babe isn’t even walking yet, do not fear! Many babes “thin out” as they become more active. You may find you eventually need to size the rise down, though as a child gets taller the rise generally continues to grow longer.

(Side notes: Baby in photo is 6 months old, 18 pounds, and 28 ½ inches long. A few brands, like Fuzzibunz and Smart Bottoms utilize adjustable elastic to ensure the best fit on their one-size diaper options. Other brands put the snap size system in the interior of the diaper, like Bottom Bumpers that employs a snap method in the back interior.)

Lynette is a mom of three children from 6 months to age four. She has cloth diapered all three since birth and enjoys all things eco-friendly and mindful living.